Walls of Connection Rotterdam

Have you ever felt scared for the future of the world?
Don’t be, there is a revolution going on and even better, you can be a part of it!

MasterPeace is a global grassroots non-profit and non-governmental peace movement that aims to mobilize people around the world to use their talent for peace building and togetherness. Founded in 2011, the movement has created various projects in combination with music, art, sports and dialogue in order to lay a foundation for a more sustainable world with less (armed) conflict. In 2013, MasterPeace received the ‘innovation in peace building’ award by UN General Secretary Mr.Ban Ki-moon on behalf of the United Nations Correspondents Association.

‘Let’s Colour Walls of Connection’ is an art and dialogue project that aims to create togetherness in communities all over the world by transforming the dull gray walls into beautiful murals with the locals. On the 23th of March MasterPeace joined forces with paint company AkzoNobel and 100 students of the Alberta College to kick off their wave of connecting murals, starting in Rotterdam. Céline van Dormalen who organized the event sat down with ASA to explain more about this great project.

-Written by Ard Doko

Hi Céline, thank you for taking the time to do this interview. In your own words, what exactly is MasterPeace?

We are a youth movement that aims to create peace in communities. Our main focus lies in mobilizing youth through various projects related to art and music. With these projects we are creating options for dialogue. I noticed that because of this, we learn to speak our minds and listen to other people’s opinion, creating a base of understanding for each other. I believe that empathy and connection is the main key to a great society. It’s amazing that it all starts with an idea and later on expands into a global campaign. Whether it’s in Colombia, Mali or even Nepal, people are coming together and starting sustainable projects in their communities.

MasterPeace transformed a lot of walls around the world in the course of the years, often in countries with major economical problems, social inequality or those that have been affected by war in the past 20 years. The Netherlands is the first West-European country where the Let’s Colour Walls of Connection project is being held, why did you choose The Netherlands?

First of all, our office is in Utrecht, The Netherlands but the main reason is that we are seeing an increase of polarization in Europe. It feels a lot like “Us versus them” and especially in the big cities, there is a lot of inequality. I have the feeling that a lot of today’s youth feel that they are stuck due to the expectations of society and that is something that is also happening in The Netherlands. On one hand, we’re aware of those problems on the other hand, we want to bend that negativity into something positive. If we emphasize that the world isn’t pretty we’re excluding room for positivity. The mindset has to change.

You said that the youth felt stuck due to the expectations of society, what are those expectations?

If I look back on all the conversations I had with the students at the Albeda College it all comes down to; having a good job, going on vacation, buying new clothes every month and the general feeling of being a part of something. Not everyone has those tools and feels left out in their community. On a broader scale, kids these days have to decide pretty fast what they want to become in life and working towards that goal. Some kids are late bloomers, what about them?

Are the expectations that you just stated new or are these recurring problems and perhaps more visible now a days?

I believe that when my parents were young they had to deal with expectations of that time as well. You will always, especially if you are young, have to deal with the fact that you have different ideas about the world. Kids need to go out to experience and see the world in order to develop. And you know what? It’s okay to choose a different path or make mistakes. I believe it was easier in the past, mistakes weren’t as visible as now a days. Snapchat and Instagram weren’t around to show other peoples success or mistakes. The way we communicate has also changed, everything is much more direct.

The keyword of your project is ‘connection’, in the current digital era it is possible to talk to someone that lives 4000 miles away from you, what kind of connection are you looking for?

We aim to create more togetherness in the world. Art is a way to spark conversation, not only in society but also in communities. Art can show you a raw and harsh reality of what is happening in the world but it can also take you to a world of imagination. You can look at a wall together and ask; what do you see, what is your opinion about that subject? That is how you start a dialogue. All around the world we are creating these murals and everyone joins in the help out with the design and painting them. It’s amazing that you can see a wall in Rotterdam that is inspired by a wall in Nepal, it feels like the whole world is coming together because of art.

Dutch Minister of Home affairs Ronald Plasterk amongst students of Albeda College stated he is in favor of more public art projects like “Let’s Color Walls of Connection” in communities.

What can you tell me about the background of the students that participated?

They are all beautiful people with a lot of ambition. Some of them have experienced a lot in life, some of them have emotional baggage and some of them feel like they are getting a second chance like, I’m 24 with two kids but I’m still going to start an education in order to improve my life. These kids are the symbol of resilience and that is what it’s all about.

You already told a bit about the creative process behind the mural, what does the mural symbolize?

The mural symbolizes the current issues the youth is facing. They’re stuck sometimes and the question is, how do I cope with it? How can I bend it in a way that there is a positive result? If you look at the mural you can see that there is a pattern. Every system has a pattern but what happens if you color that pattern? It also symbolizes the will to get higher up in life (points at the staircase structure) and that everything is connected. So even though you feel stuck inside the system sometimes, the system is dynamic. I believe the graphic designers of “Het Proces” (Dutch for the process) knew exactly how to put those issues and feelings in one big design.

The finished mural

 

You are planning on doing more murals all over the world this time, a 100 to be exact. Are you planning on doing more murals in The Netherlands?

We’re not focusing on The Netherlands alone, the murals in Barcelona and Paris for example are just as important. I’m looking forward to the themes we have in The Netherlands but let’s look at the global perspective. A mural in Indonesia should impress me just as much as the one in The Netherlands.

Thank you for your time.

Are you an artist that wants to take part in this project click the link:
http://www.masterpeace.org/sign-up-as-an-artist/

For more info about walls of connection click here:
http://www.masterpeace.org/walls-of-connection/

For general information about MasterPeace click here:
http://www.masterpeace.org/about/

Dubai Canvas 3D Art Festival 2017

Next week the Dubai Canvas 3D Art Festival starts from the 1st of March to the 7th of March, where they will hand out the 1st 3D Street Art awards. Organized by Brand Dubai,

Maybe you have already read about it or someone told you, this event will give out a total of $600.000. The winner will win a price of $350.000. This is the first time in the world that this will happen and yes of course this happens in Dubai. ASA will be in Dubai during the event to report true our social media about this great event. Next to the conventional 3D artists there will also be artists known from the Street Art scene like Fanakapan and Kobra.

As Ayesha bin Kalli the Project Manager of Dubai Canvas said: “Dubai Canvas 2017 will feature the creations of some of the world’s most skilled and innovative 3D artists who are pioneers of various new styles, techniques. These are artists whose work has expanded the possibilities of 3D art and inspired many other artists across the world.

The artist will start the week before of the festival from the 22nd of February to 28th of February. This will give the public the opportunity to see the artist at work and during the festival they can enjoy the many great photo moments created by the TOP of the 3D artists in the world.

Many of the 25 artists in the shortlist are international luminaries in the 3D art world. Versatile Italian artist Tony Cuboliquido was the first to experiment with anamorphic 3D art and animated art with video mapping. His works have been commissioned by some of the world’s largest companies including Disney, Universal Cinema, Luxottica, Amazon, Coca-Cola, Samsung and Unilever. Cuboliquido’s works can be seen in the ‘Basilica of the Nativity’ in Bethlehem and the Basilica of the ‘Virgin of Nativity’ in Mexico City.

Returning to Dubai for another edition of Dubai Canvas is Leon Keer a world-leading 3D street artist. He has executed commissions in Europe, the United States, Mexico, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Russia, New Zealand, Australia and several Asian countries. His work features topical issues including current environmental concerns. The Dutch artist is constantly aware of the playfulness and beauty around him compared to the degradation, a contrast that he expresses and amplifies in his work.

Another artist returning to Dubai for the Festival is Fanakapan, a leading street artist based in London. Fanakapan started painting on the streets in 2000 around Bournemouth and Bristol following his studies at art school. His works of graffiti feature realistic balloon animals and letters. Fanakapan’s works depict letters shaped as silver foil balloons, whose lighting and shine make them seem as if they are bouncing off the wall. Fanakapan has painted graffiti art in different locations around the world in his highly technical free hand style that he has mastered over the past few years.

KAS, born and raised in Porto in Portugal, has worked in graffiti projects for several national and international companies. He has also participated in various street art events in Europe and international exhibitions across the world. His recent 3D works mix photorealism and puzzle patterns. He currently lives and works in Brussels, Belgium. KAS developed a passion for art at a young age. The self-made artist learned informally from some of the greatest graffiti artists in Portugal.

Japanese artist Tomoteru ‘Tomo’ Saito has won prestigious awards in street painting, most notably at the Grazie di Curtatone Madonnari Competition in Mantova, Italy where he was awarded the first place among ‘Maestri Madonnari’ in 2000 and 2001. He has participated in street painting festivals across Europe, US, Mexico, Hong Kong and Dubai. In 2016, he won the People’s Choice Award at the Street Painting Festival in Toulon, France; the first prize in the category of ‘Copyists’ at the Street Art Festival in Wilhelmshaven, Germany; and the first prize in the category of ‘Classical’ at Little Italy Madonnari Arts Festival in Baltimore, US.

Mexican artist Juandrés Vera’s work has been exhibited in museums and galleries in cities such as Monterrey, Guanajuato and Durango in Mexico, Paris and New York. Juandrés Vera has obtained several awards from urban art projects such as both ephemeral and permanent murals in two-dimensional mode and anamorphic mode (3D) in countries such as United States, United Kingdom, Italy, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Thailand and UAE, among others. He currently resides in León, Mexico.

Brazilian artist Eduardo Kobra was born in São Paulo. At the invitation of the municipality of São Paulo, he made the first 3D pavement painting in Brazil. Cities where Kobra has displayed his artwork include Moscow, Lexington, Los Angeles, London, Athens, Lyon, New York. and Miami.  Kobra has painted a mural on the facade of ‘Museo dell’Altro e Dell’Altrove’, which faces the historical Via Prenestina in Rome. In Sweden, he painted the ‘Alfred Nobel’ mural in the city of Boras; and Poland, at the invitation of Urban Forms Gallery, where he painted The ‘Rubinstein’ on a huge wall. Kobra and his team now hold the Guinness World Record for the largest spray paint mural by a team. The work, which was commissioned by Rio 2016 to decorate the Olympic Boulevard, measures 3,000 square meters.

Laurent Hamelin, also known as Milouz, is a self-taught French artist, who is the founder of the famous TSFcrew. Painting since 1995, he started his career as a graffiti artist and quickly began painting big figurative walls with his group. For more than ten years, he has worked in partnership with the artist Papy. Together, they have painted enormous ‘trompe l’oeil’ pieces that opened doors to dreamlike universes. The quality and originality of his creations brought invitations from around the world to create anamorphic pieces, apart from the opportunity to work with famous brands.

Portuguese artist Odeith, best known as one of the pioneers of 3D graffiti, is one of the shortlisted artists who will be displaying his work at the Festival. Odeith’s artworks are extremely detailed and realistic, almost photographic in their precision, creating the impression of something solid. Viewers often find it hard to believe that his 3D works are regular flat-surface paintings and not sculptures when seen from a certain distance. Internationally recognized for his 3D pieces, Odeith is often invited to exhibit his work outside of his native Portugal. Odeith is no stranger to Dubai having exhibited his work in last year’s Dubai Canvas.

Qi Xinghua, who describes himself as ‘China’s first 3D artist’, is a four-time Guinness World record holder for making the world’s largest 3D paintings. Xinghua, who is making his second appearance at the annual Dubai Canvas Festival, is renowned for the strong 3D impact of his designs, which often leave people wondering what is real and what is fantasy. He uses a technique called ‘reverse version’ or ‘inverse-perspective’ in which far away objects appear big and close objects small.

Ruben Poncia from the Netherlands is another artist returning to Dubai for this year’s Festival. He started his career making acrylic and oil paintings in a realistic or surrealistic style in which he sometimes used perspective tricks. Later, he used his perspective tricks to create 3D street art. Poncia, who now works mainly as a 3D street artist, performs at 5-10 festivals a year. He considers street art as an artistic challenge as the artist is out in the open and has a limited time to create his work.

Remko van Schaik from Netherlands, yet another artist returning to Dubai for the Festival, believes 3D street painting is a great test of an artist’s creativity and skills since it is a very public activity. He started pursuing street painting after seeing street painters working in his hometown Utrecht. After initially creating 2D street paintings in the traditional way, he got interested in the technique of making 3D street paintings.

Truman Adams, who sold his first painting at 10, is a versatile artist who works in a range of genres: mosaics, portraits, illustration, fine art, murals, decorative, and 3D and 2D street art.

Vera Bugatti, an Italian artist and street painter whose works feature human, ontological and environmental issues, takes inspiration both from ancient and contemporary themes. She has taken part in several street art events all over the world. Bugatti works with several techniques, ranging from chalk and paints to wire, electric elements and nails.

Rene Muniz, from Brazil, is an advertising and graffiti artist, whose passion is to convey positive messages like love and peace through art.

Russian artist Nikolaj Arndt who also participated in Dubai Canvas last year, has displayed his 3D art pieces at street art festivals in different cities across the world. In 2006, Nikolaj Arndt moved to Germany where he is now based. He currently teaches at a private art school and works with advertising agencies and galleries.

Ryszard Paprocki is an architect and painter who is considered Poland’s most renowned 3D artist. Since 2011, he has created several large 3D paintings in Poland and across the world. His work is usually created in the presence of a large audience. Separately, he also creates easel paintings, monumental paintings, interior designs, sculptures, landscape architecture and industrial design as well as abstract paintings, installations and large hyper-realistic 3D graffiti.

Dima Fatum, a Ukrainian street artist’s works are characterized by unique experiments with different artistic styles and genres including surrealism, the ‘double’ images and calligraphy. His work also combines post-graffiti and abstract graffiti styles.

American artist John Pugh’s works focus primarily on 3D wall murals. Pugh has received numerous public and private commissions in the United States, Taiwan, and New Zealand. His particular mural style sparked the term ‘Narrative Illusionism’

German artist Ella Mundt has collaborated with the well-known street artists Manfred Stader and Edgar Müller. She runs a studio for commissioned works with special focus on portraits.

Gennaro Troia, an accomplished Italian pavement artist, is the founder of the Neapolitan School of Madonnari, a group of artists who have exhibited their unique creations across the world.

Hungarian artist Fat Heat, who calls himself an ‘addict’ to graffiti art, got bitten by the art bug in 1998 when he first encountered another artist’s work on some buildings near his home. His works can be found in the form of large murals throughout Europe.

Andres Iglesias Petroselli, an Argentinian artist’s work has been displayed in Brazil, Spain, France and Netherlands apart from Argentina. Also known as Cobre, Petroselli is one of Argentina’s major 3D artists.

Russian artist Danila Shmelev, who has previously worked as a tattoo artist, started painting 3D art after she worked in a 3D illusion museum. She took part in the uinternational art festival ‘Stenograffia’ with two 3D artworks.

Dubai Canvas 3D Art Award received a total of 122 entries from 35 countries. Artists who submitted proposals for the Award represent almost 80% of the global community of 3D artists. The initial selection committee shortlisted 25 artists for the final round of the Award. Their works will be featured in the third Dubai Canvas Festival taking place in March. We are confident that the stunning art on display at the Festival will attract large audiences across all ages,” Bin Kalli added.  

A jury comprising of renowned international and local artists will evaluate the 25 shortlisted artworks to select three winners of the Dubai Canvas 3D Art Award. The winners will be honored at a ceremony to be held at the Festival. There will also be a ‘People’s Choice’ award based on votes from the public.

Team ASA is looking forward to report you live from the event. ASA will be in Dubai from 27 of February till the 2nd of March. We will update you everyday with photos,videos and live streams from our Facebook page

Twelve 3D Artists, 1 City

Muros 2016- Street_Art Walls

MUROS -Tabacalera is a Madrid Street Art Project initiative for the Fine Arts Department of Spanish Ministry of Culture, Education and Sports whose aim is to recover the outer walls of an old tobacco factory by transforming them into a Street Art space for the delight of everyone.

This new edition of MUROS comes after the great success of 2014 edition where 26 artists participated in the festival, and a few months after the 1st INTRAMUROS Edition held last November, an event that brought together Street_Artists, art managers, journalists,  art experts and general public to share their views and experience on Urban Art and related topics.

Artist: Animalito Land Photo: MSAP

Artist: Animalito Land
Photo: MSAP

You may wonder what Tabacalera is??

Tabacalera building is located in the heart of Madrid, in calle Embajadores. The premises were built between 1780 and 1782, as part of the urban policy of Borbon Monarchs that sought the transformation of the city and set up various Royal Companies in southern districts of Madrid.

Artist: Add Fuel Photo: MSAP

Artist: Add Fuel
Photo: MSAP

Formerly a spirit-drink factory and, then, a  playing –card plant, in 1809 the Royal Tobacco Company was set ip and operated until the end of the 20th century. Currently, the premises house the National Visual Arts Centre.

Artist: Lelo Photo: MSAP

Artist: Lelo
Photo: MSAP

Two years after its first edition, Muros Tabacalera holds a new one: Urban Natures. This year urban_art pieces revolve around the concept of Urban Natures.  The aim is to reflect on the nature of contemporary cities, the ways of life in them and the type of society they embrace, as well as the hostility they exert upon people, pollution problems and lack of natural spaces.  Muros-Tabacalera seeks to change this situation from a metaphorical perspective through art pieces that substitute grey cement for nature.

Artist: Btoy Photo: MSAP

Artist: Btoy
Photo: MSAP

However, this  can be controversial since some people may claim that when your issue is the environment,  art works using chemical paint sprays can defeat the aimed message.  I´ll go back on the enviroment and Street art in a future post.

Muros Tabacalera Photo: MSAP

Muros Tabacalera
Photo: MSAP

 

The artists participating in this Street_Art festival have created their art pieces directly on Tabacalera walls for the joy of neighbours and visitors.

Street_Art Windows

Street_Art takes Madrid Windows in CALLE 2016!!! You still don´t  know what CALLE is?? C.A.L.L.E stands for Convocatoria Artística Libre LAvapiés Emergente, in English, Free Artistic Award of Emerging Lavapies) 2016 , a fantastic Street_Art exhibition taking place in Madrid these days.

Artist: Ramón Amorós - Photo: CALLE

Artist: Ramón Amorós – Photo: CALLE

C.A.L.L.E is a Street_Art exhibition in Lavapies, an emerging and creative historic district in down-town Madrid. This award is sponsored by local businesses, like bars, coffee-houses, bookshops… Artistic creations will be shown in the façades, windows and outdoor spaces of these business for two weeks.

Artis: Alva Moca Photo: CALLE

Artis: Alva Moca Photo: CALLE

Sixty artists, both domestic and international, are participating in this new edition. Visitors and neighbours have the opportunity to discover the latest trends in street painting, sculpture, photography and so on… displayed by different artists in 60 business of this district.

Artists: HO Colectivo- Photo: CALLE

Artists: HO Colectivo– Photo: CALLE

The Asociación de Comerciantes de Lavapiés, the local trade association, launched this initiative three years ago. They aimed to boost artistic creation in the district from an open and participative point of view, and as a way to attract visitors, both locals and tourists, to enjoy this experience in a friendly way and in people´s everyday lives.

Artists: Tricroico - Photo: CALLE

Artists: Tricroico – Photo: CALLE

This outdoor museum promotes relationship between artists and traders, while adding a distinctive and unique touch to the district. CALLE makes Lavapiés an open air museum, following the footsteps of similar projects in Berlin, Paris or Istanbulv

Artist: Palau - Photo: CALLE

Artist: Palau – Photo: CALLE #Street_Art

For the complete list of the art pieces and artists participating in this edition , click here.

Find out who´s won this competition, click here.